What Would You Wish?

Peace-tagged olive trees, elementary school children, and Yoko Ono have converged on South Pasadena’s soil.

At Arroyo Vista Elementary (AV), children in all grades, K-5, drew or wrote their wishes for peace on sending labels and tied them to the branches of two donated olive trees.

While picking-up my son at school, I noticed a few children sifting through branches of these lofty potted trees, intently reading what looked like blossoms from afar. They were reading wish-filled tags, saying, “Hey, listen to this one…”

Intrigued, I too, read some… And I actually began to tear. Then I laughed. And then I did a double take. Surprised by what I read, I was in awe at the profundity of children’s hopes:

“I wish that my Geanie Pig was still with me and my sister.” “I wish my sister and brother wouldn’t fight with me.” “I wish my mom and dad wont fight anymore.” “I wish that everyone had a bed to sleep in.” “I wish we had a much cleaner and non-polluted WORLD” “I wish that all of the animals would be free and safe.” “I wish that people got more money!$” “No more war” “I wish that God will bless the solgers in the war fighting for this wonderfol place.” (Quotes are as is.)

As we live amidst an ailing economy, wars fought for the greater good, and hurting people, the hope for peace is often a distant ethereal dream. But without that dream, where would we reach?

Leslie Brill, volunteer parent and secretary at AV, took an active step toward peace and initiated the Wishing Tree Project out of a desire to inspire the children by providing an opportunity to voice their hopes while celebrating the United Nations’ International Day of Peace (September 21) “to recognize the efforts of those who have worked hard to end conflict and promote peace… It is also a day of ceasefire – personal or political,” added Brill. And her hope for the kids was “to think of a wish that was bigger than their selves.”

When the principal, Cheryl Busick, was asked about what she especially liked about the project, she responded, “I love walking out in the courtyard and seeing 6-12 students gathered around the quotes. It’s so inspiring knowing that these kids can change the world and make our school’s wishes come true.” Her own wishes include, “Happiness for all – I am a believer that if kids are happy, they will learn.”

A wish tree is not a new concept. Many cultures have their versions of a wish tree: the Norfolk Island Pine in Australia from the early 1800’s, the sacred Camphor tree at Meiji Shrine in Japan, and a healing ash tree in Scotland, to name a few.

At the core of these wish trees, there is a sense that certain trees have unique, even supernatural quality that draw people to whisper wishes toward it, touch it, walk around it, or place their written wishes on branches or at the base. For many, these decorated trees are a reminder and a representation of peace, hope, and a common unity that serves us all well (like the olive trees at AV).

The project at AV was modeled after one done by Yoko Ono, an artist, performer, and widow of John Lennon. Since 1981 she began to popularize the wish tree with her interactive “Wish Tree” project that spanned the globe. People in various cities placed their wishes on tags and tied them to branches of various trees.

Heavy and drooping with wishes, Ono eventually collected the one million plus tags and placed them in capsules around the “Imagine Peace Tower” of light in Iceland, her art piece commemorating her late husband while promoting peace and solidarity. The unveiling of the tower occurred in 2007, and was recently relit on October 9, 2011 in memory of Lennon’s 71st birthday.

With the holidays quickly approaching and the decking of our beloved trees and homes upon us, I search for meaningful traditions to help my kids think beyond the tangible joys of the season (lights and presents). The wishing tree project inspired me to prepare for a new tradition for our family this year: placing our written wishes on the Christmas tree and maybe even the trees outside our home, then choosing a couple and making them come true through the new year. Maybe you can do the same or some creative version of it.

This way, wishes are more than lofty dreams, they’re stepping-stones to a new reality.

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